Palin as in mail-in

Your vote, that is.

Is that where they keep them?

You can’t escape justice merely by donning a tin hat, it seems. The European Court of Human Rights, his last resort after a series of British courts were unhelpful, has refused to block the extradition to the U.S. of Gary McKinnon, a Briton who hacked into Pentagon and NASA computers.

Brown Palace Hotel and brownshirts in Denver

The CensorThese days you’d think that perhaps (maybe from reading my other blog) free expression, commercial or otherwise, were solely an Internet issue, and the MSM is mostly on the other side of it, hiding behind some pretextual body of law or another. (And perhaps you’d think free expression were solely a suntan lotion issue!) But it’s not:

DENVER–Police in Denver arrested an ABC News producer today as he and a camera crew were attempting to take pictures on a public sidewalk of Democratic Senators and VIP donors leaving a private meeting at the Brown Palace Hotel.

Police on the scene refused to tell ABC lawyers the charges against the producer, Asa Eslocker, who works with the ABC News investigative unit. . . .

A police official later told lawyers for ABC News that Eslocker is being charged with trespass, interference, and failure to follow a lawful order. He also said the arrest followed a signed complaint from the Brown Palace Hotel.

Read the whole article (via Glenn Reynolds), which includes language we don’t even bleep out at LIKELIHOOD OF CONFUSION

Stout, rested and ready!

The Stout Republican is back!

EL PUEBLO! CORTESA! JAMS SER TRISTEZA!

Speaking Truth to Moonbats

Speaking Truth to Moonbats

Bruce Weinstein sends along his latest column in Business Week, “The Ethics of Protesting.”

A Code of Ethics for Protesting

Yes, we have a responsibility to speak up when we are upset by what’s going on in the world, but there are better and worse ways to do it, from both ethical and practical perspectives. The goal of any protest is a moral one: to make things better (BusinessWeek.com, 1/18/07). However, this concern must be balanced against the ethical obligations to do no harm (BusinessWeek.com, 1/11/07), respect others (BusinessWeek.com, 1/31/07), and be fair (BusinessWeek.com, 2/15/07). With these concerns in mind, I propose the following code of ethics for those on either side of the forthcoming protests:

1. Obey the law, or be willing to accept the consequences. …

2. Be tolerant. …

3. Being respectful increases the chances that you’ll get you what you want. …

4. Accept that fairness is a bedrock of democracy. …

5. Recognize that our eyes are on the same prize. …

6. Spend your money. …

I love Bruce. His faith in humanity is almost palpable! Is he wrong to think he is talking to people who have some quantum of moral judgment, perspective, or common sense, as opposed to people like this?:

Moral Equivalence from Man Whose Hand not Sawed Off

Moral Equivalence from Man Whose Hand not Sawed Off

Well, it’s not really all that bad. In fact, there’s plenty of evidence that, the contemptible creeps at this link notwithstanding, a sunny afternoon spent at impotent, self-gratifying political “protests” is considered a healthy, affordable and fun family outing among certain cadres of suburban Stalinists as well as those geriatric hippies for whom it is always 1968 both in their hearts and their hampers.

Those toothless and tender types, I imagine, are Bruce’s intended audience… reading Business Week both to identify the fat cat villains and also have nice block letters to cut out. Man the barricades for good manners and just plain decency!

Hat tip to Pam for the links to the street scrapings.

EL PUEBLO! CORTESA! JAMAS SERA TRISTEZA!

Speaking Truth to Moonbats

Speaking Truth to Moonbats

Bruce Weinstein sends along his latest column in Business Week, “The Ethics of Protesting.”

A Code of Ethics for Protesting

Yes, we have a responsibility to speak up when we are upset by what’s going on in the world, but there are better and worse ways to do it, from both ethical and practical perspectives. The goal of any protest is a moral one: to make things better (BusinessWeek.com, 1/18/07). However, this concern must be balanced against the ethical obligations to do no harm (BusinessWeek.com, 1/11/07), respect others (BusinessWeek.com, 1/31/07), and be fair (BusinessWeek.com, 2/15/07). With these concerns in mind, I propose the following code of ethics for those on either side of the forthcoming protests:

1. Obey the law, or be willing to accept the consequences. …

2. Be tolerant. …

3. Being respectful increases the chances that you’ll get you what you want. …

4. Accept that fairness is a bedrock of democracy. …

5. Recognize that our eyes are on the same prize. …

6. Spend your money. …

I love Bruce. His faith in humanity is almost palpable! Is he wrong to think he is talking to people who have some quantum of moral judgment, perspective, or common sense, as opposed to people like this?:

Moral Equivalence from Man Whose Hand not Sawed Off

Moral Equivalence from Man Whose Hand not Sawed Off

Well, it’s not really all that bad. In fact, there’s plenty of evidence that, the contemptible creeps at this link notwithstanding, a sunny afternoon spent at impotent, self-gratifying political “protests” is considered a healthy, affordable and fun family outing among certain cadres of suburban Stalinists as well as those geriatric hippies for whom it is always 1968 both in their hearts and their hampers.

Those toothless and tender types, I imagine, are Bruce’s intended audience… reading Business Week both to identify the fat cat villains and also have nice block letters to cut out. Man the barricades for good manners and just plain decency!

Hat tip to Pam for the links to the street scrapings.

Attorney Ronald D. Coleman